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scientific knowledge, policies, or practices. 




ISSUED WEEKLY BY 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 

VOLT 33 nDECEMBHRlL47~1936 _ NO. 24 

W ff- . 'f' 'f Hf *«• I': 

IN THIS ISSUE 

Page 

European bread-grain situation 755 

Taiwan rice crop largest on record 758 

Northern Brazil cotton crop reduced 759 

Japanese imports of American cotton show seasonal increase 759 

Chile fixes melon quota for New York market .. 760 

Cuban tomato exports to be larger and of high quality 761 

Danubian lard and hog prospects 762 

United Kingdom imposes duty on beef imports 764 

China facilitates movement of foodstuffs 765 

United States agricultural exports during October 765 



754 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, No. 24 

LATE CABLES 



Italy 1936 production reported as follows, with 1935 comparisons 
in parentheses; Wheat 227,100,000 bushels (283,883,000), com 119,034,000 
bushels (95,195,000), rice 940,424,000 pounds -{862, 774, 000) , potatoes 
93,612,000 bushels (79,333,000). (international Institute of Agriculture, 
Rome, December 9, 1936.) 

Poland area sown for 1937 harvest indicates a decline from 1936, the 
acreage of winter wheat being reduced by 2.4 percent end that of winter rye 
by 0.7 percent. (international Institute of Agriculture, Rome, December 9, 
1936.) 

Egyptian cotton pr od uction, second estimate for 1936-57 , placed at 
2,002,000 bales of 478 pounds each, compared with 1,750,000 bales reported 
at this time last year, and a final estimate of 1,769,000 bales for 1935-36 
(international Institute of Agriculture, Rome, December 9, 1936.) 

The British Board of Trade an noun ces that the bacon quot a, to fore ign 
suppliers for the first 6 weeks of 1937 (January 1 - February 11) will 
amount to 616,553 cwt . (69,054,000 pounds), of which the United States is 
allotted the usual 8.1 percent (5,593,000 pounds). This new quota repre- 
sents an increase over that granted for the comparable weeks of 1936 of 
more than 6 percent. In comparison with the permitted rate of imports 
during the last 6 weeks of this current year (November 20 - December 31) 
the increase is equal to nearly 12 percent. The larger quota figures sug- 
gest an inadequate response to the 1937 contracts offered to British pro- 
ducers for bacon pigs. To the first of December, only 1,800,000 pigs had 
been contracted for, and it was reported that all contracts might be in- 
validated by the Bacon Board unless 2,200,000 pigs were put under contract 
by December 14, the final date set for making contracts for the coming 
year. (Agricultural Attache' C. C. Taylor, London, December 10, 1936.) 



December 14, 1936 foreign Crops and Markets 

CROP AND MARKET PROSPECTS 



755 



BREAD GRAINS 
The Euro pean brea d- grain sit uatio n in Nove mber 



European countries displayed an active interest in foreign wheat during 
November. Not only was current business well maintained by the usual import- 
ing countries, but there were noteworthy purchases, or arrangements for imports, 
by such countries as Italy and Germany, which in recent years have played a 
very minor role in the European wheat trade. Early in the season Italy was 
an active purchaser of Danubian wheat and recently ha.s been importing Argentine 
wheat. The Danube countries continued to export actively and up to December 1 
had disposed of about half of their surplus, which was estimated at about 
97,000,000 bushels. These countries probably will take a more important part 
in the world wheat trad® during 1936-37 than they have for several years. 

Pall seeding and crop conditio ns 

Seeding of fall grain proceeded in a generally satisfactory way in the 
Danube Basin, in most of the Mediterranean countries, and in the British Isles. 
In much of central Europe, however, delays occurred as a result of rainy weather. 
In the Danube Basin, indications pointed to a net increase of probably 5 to 
10 percent. In Bulgaria and Rumania, fall seedings have been considerably 
above those of last year, and a slight increase in Yugoslavia appeared likely. 
Hungary, on the other hand, has experienced much unfavorable weather, which 
has delayed seeding operations, .'and some decrease in area may result. 

With the generally favorable weather conditions reported this fall in 
western Mediterranean countries, other than Spain, it seemed likely that a 
full acreage would be planted, particularly in prance and Italy. In the 
British Isles, after two seasons of declining wheat acreage, some increase in 
the area sown seemed probable, since conditions have been favorable for fall 
seeding. A definite effort is being made in Czechoslovakia to reduce acreage, 
and it is possible that a small but not especially significant net decrease will 
take place for the region as a whole. The acreage in Austria may be increased 
somewhat because of the planned reduction in sugar beets. 

The condition of the growing wheat crop was considered to be generally 
good in the Danube Basin region, but in central Europe official condition figures 
have been below those of last season and in some cases below average. TChile 
favorable weather conditions during the winter and spring may easily modify this 
situation and improve the prospects of this region, it appeared significant that 
this is the first season in several years that -the crop of central Europe has 
not made a good or very good start. 



756 



Foreign Crops and Markets 
CROP AND MARKET PROSPECTS, 



Vol. 33 No. 24 
CONT'D 



Revisions of official crop estimates for 1936 show few significant 
changes. Slight upward revisions were reported in Finland, Latvia, and 
in the Danube countries, but these were fully offset by a decline noted for 
the Irish Tree State and prospects for a smaller Italian crop than was 
previously expected. 

Market situation 

Although overseas wheat prices declined somewhat during November as 
a result of fairly good crop prospects in Argentina, such weakness was only 
partially reflected in European surplus countries and those not having a 
fixed-price system. This was due largely to slow deliveries by farmers 
who were occupied with farm work and also to a certain extent to the firm 
attitude maintained by some of the European exporters. The agricultural 
countries of the Danube Basin and Poland are in a fortunate position this 
year, because several of the larger nations have been competing strongly • 
with each other in arranging trade agreements or making direct purchases of 
their surplus products, especially grain. This situation may continue, not 
only for political reasons, but particularly because grain import needs are 
greater and more general this year. 

In Prance the Wheat Board has been functioning fairly well, and 
grain was being sold at the prices fixed. Some Erench "bread wheat was 
sold in Tunisia to meet the deficit there. At the same time, difficulty • 
was experienced in obtaining durum wheats from northern Africa for the 
semolina trade in France. Demand was active, but sellers in Algeria have 
been generally inclined to hold. It is expected that Prance will soon be 
obliged to seek elsewhere for durum. Traders appeared anxious to buy Cana- 
dian Western Amber and have been speculating on the possibilities of get- 
ting supplies of Candeal from South America. 

Italy was a Tery active buyer of foreign wheat in November, first of 
Danubian and tken of Argentine offers. This is the first season in recent 
years that early buying in any volume has teen noted in Italy. In some 
(Quarters this was believed to be the result of a very poor crop outturn; ■ 
other observers attributed purchases to the holding activities of growers 
and to the establishment of reserves for possible future needs and for 
flaur exports to Spain. Exports from the Danube Basin countries, have been 
very active this fall to contxnental countries and to the British , Isles. 
The record crop has made it possible for the Danubian countries to obtain 
more free foreign exchange from whea.t than has been the ca.se in several 
years. Although the greater part of the Danube' crop is usually exported 
in the fall months, the volume of exports through November exceeded that 
for the corresponding period of any recent year. 

Other continental exports have been rather limited, and in Poland, 
despite a recent price decline in sympathy with overseas wheat, domestic 
market prices have remained above export parity. Parm deliveries have 



December 14, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 757 

CROP AND MARKET PROSPECTS, C 0 K I'D 



"been slow this fall "both on account of 
about a possible currency devaluation, 
made from Czechoslovakia. 



farm work and the apprehension felt 
Some limited exports have also been 



Sovi et Unio n 

The 1936 sowing campaign in the Soviet Union can be regarded as 
practically completed, 98 percent of the plan having been seeded by Novem- 
ber 20. The total acreage of winter crops sown by that date amounted to 
92,910,000 acres compared with 90,933,000 acres seeded by November 10, 
1935 (the nearest date for which information is available) and 92,415,000 
acres reported sown as of January 1, 1936. Sowings are now going on almost 
exclusively in the Middle Asiatic Republics and Transcaucasia. About one- 
third of the total area in the former and 25 to 50 percent of the area of 
the latter region will have to be sown after the dates stipulated by the 
Government. The acreage of the fallow plowing accomplished by Hovember 20 
of this year was given at 133,600,000 acres compared with 111,700,000 acres 
on the same date last year. It is the largest fall-plowed acreage on record. 
Complaints, however, continue in the Soviet press that the present extent 
of mechanization of agriculture should enable still larger and more timely 
execution of fall pi o wings. 

As was reported last month, Ukraine, the Azov-Black Sea region, 
Crimea, and the Gorky region were the only regions which had completed 
their grain procurings by October 15. During the following weeks only 
Georgia and Turkmen! a (both unimportant grain-producing regions) and more 
recently the North Caucasian region a/ reported completion of their procur- 
ing plans. Last year full completion of the procuring p'ian for the Union 
as a whole, as well as for the principal grain regions, was reported by the 
middle of October. Since this year no other import ant region, except the 
southern regions mentioned, has reported completion of its respective plan, 
the belief that a smaller crop has been harvested in the Soviet Union this 
year would seem to be confirmed. 

Although there were some beneficial rains, precipitation during the 
first 3 weeks of November does not seem to have been very plentiful, par- 
ticularly in Crimea, the Volga regions, and. the former North Caucasus. In 
fact these regions seem to be experiencing a deficiency of moisture. Very 
little is known as to the condition of fall- sown crops, but it appears that 
in parts of the south as well as in the Volga regions sprouting was rendered 
difficult by insufficient moisture and fall-sown crops are still rather weak 
and delayed. Pro sty weather occurred in the northern section of the Union 
around the middle of November and temperatures fell rapidly to low levels in 
the northeastern regions. Snow cover is reported over the northern half of 

a/ Procurings in the latter region are reported to have exceeded those of 
1935 "despite unfavorable weather conditions." 



758 



CHOP 



Foreign Crops and Markets 
AND MARKET PROSPECTS, 



Vol. 35. No. 24 
C 0 II T'B 



the country, "but it is probably not very deep as yet. Around November 
20 colder temperatures were reoorted from the southern section of the Union, 
but the fields were still hare there; during the next few days, the snov; 
cover moved farther south and by November 25 practically the whole of 
Ukraine, the extreme south excepted, was covered oy snow. The North 
Caucasus and the Volga regions south of the line Rostov-Vorone j-Kuibishev 
(fo rmerly Samara) were still without snow. 



RICE 

Taiwan 1936 record rice crop 

The Taiwan (Formosa) second rice croo for 1936 was officially 
estimated at 26,077,000 bushels of cleaned rice, according to information 
supplied by American Consul Maney of Formosa through the Shanghai office 
of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics. This amount compares with 
24,500,000 bushels for the second crop of 1935. The total production, 
first and second crops, for 1956 equals 50,300,000 bushels compared with 
46,700,000 bushels for 1935. The 1936 second crop and the total production 
for the year are the largest crops ever grown in Taiwan. The previous 
records were the 1935 second crop and the total harvest. 

Taiwan rice production has raoidly increased during the past 20 years 
and the present harvests now average approximately 100 percent larger than 
20 years ago. This increase is primarily the result of higher yields and, 
secondarily, of bringing more land into rice cultivation. According to 
the estimates of the Japanese officials, 23,700,000 bushels were used for 
domestic consumption during the 1935-36 crop year, and 23,900,000 bushels 
were exported to Japan. The carry-over on November 1, 1936, was 3,500,000 
bushels compared with 2,900,000 on November 1, 1935. 

TAIWAN: Production of rice, in terms of cleaned, 1932-1936 



Year 



Second 



To tal 




Taiwan official estimates supplied by American Consul Maney 



December 14, '1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 759 

CROP AND MARKET PROSPECTS, C 0 I I'D 



COTTON 

Cot ton cr op reduced in Northern Braz il 

The second official estimate of the 1935 cotton crop in Northern 
Brazil, harvesting of which is now taking place, is for a yield of approxi- 
mately 605,000 bales of 478 pounds each, according to Consul General Emil 
Sauer in Rio de Janeiro. This would represent a reduction of 26 percent 
from the 819,000 hales harvested in Northern Brazil in 1935. In 1934, the 
crop in that part of the country amounted to 782,000 hales and in 1933 to 
483,000 hales. The first estimate of the 1936 crop in Northern Brazil, 
made last July, was for 812,000 hales. That estimate was predicated upon 
the continuation of favorable climatic conditions and the absence of serious 
insect damage prior to the harvesting period. The final estimate of the 
crop will not be made until next March. It is too early to estimate the 
total 1936-37 cotton crop of Brazil, since Southern Brazil is only now 
planting its crop . Harvesting in Southern Brazil does not begin until March. 

Total cotton production in Brazil has shown a marked upward trend 
in recent years. The 1935-36 crop amounted to 1,718,000 bales compared with 
1,359,000 bales in 1934-35 and 1,014,000 bales in 1933-34. Tbe average for 
the 5 years ended with the 1932-53 crop was only 498,000 bales annually. 
During the 5 crop years ended with 1935-36, when the total Brazilian cotton 
crop averaged 1,364,000 bales annually, the Northern Brazil crop averaged 
695,000 bales or 51 percent, and the Southern Brazil crop 669,000 bales or 
49 percent, production has been expanding much more rapidly in Southern 
Brazil than in Northern Brazil because of continued depression in the coffee 
industry, good returns from cotton compared with those from coffee, the 
availability of labor formerly devoted to coffee production in those States, 
and higher yields per acre in recent years in the South than in the north. 
Reports from Southern Brazil indicate that considerable acreages now in 
cotton recently were timber and brush lands. 

Japanese imports of American cotton show seasonal increase 

The Japanese October imports of raw cotton amounted to 199,000 tales 
as compared with 150,000 bales during October of last year, according to 
information received from Agricultural Commissioner Owen L. Dawson, at 
Shanghai- American cotton imports increased £x)in 27,000 bales in September 
to 47,000 bales in October. American cotton afloat and imown future com- 
mitments indicate that considerable quantities of such cotton will reach 
Japan during the forthcoming winter months. Japanese October imports of 
Indian cotton amounted to 73,000 bales, or slightly less than half of the 
volume imported in September. Imports of Chinese cotton of the new crop 
were relatively large during October. October imports of Brazilian cotton, 
according to Vice Consul McConaughy at Kobe, amounted to 56,000 bales, the 
largest volume ever registered in any month from that source. It is 



760 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, No, 24 

CROP AND MARKET PROSPECTS, COHT'D 



though tithsb imports of Brazilian cotton will not be large from now on until 
early next summer, when the new Brazilian cotton crop will appear on the 
market . 

Total October yarn production amounted to 293,000 bales of 400 pounds 
as against 292,000 bales in September and 293,000 bales in October of last 
year. Japanese cotton mills are continuing the curtailment rate of 26.2 
percent of their spindles for yarn production. 

There was no appreciable change in wharf stocks during October. The 
total of 437,000 bales is somewhat above the 5-year average and considerably 
above the abnormally low figure of a year ago. Stocks of American cotton 
are higher than those of a year ago but lower than the 5-year average. In 
view of the strong demand for cotton, it is not expected that the volume of 
stocks now available will weaken the price. 

The semiannual report of the Japanese Cotton Spinning Association 
for the first half of 1936 shows that a high rate of profit was earned, 
although not quite as high as that of the last half of 1935. Dividend 
rates, reserves, fixed capital redemption, and the balance carried forward 
showed decreases. In.cres.ses were registered in fixed assets, due to a 
larger number of installed spindles. Out of a total number of 10,992,000 
installed spindles, only 8,424,000 spindles were in operation. The cor- 
responding figures for September were 10,862,000 and 8,327,000, respectively. 
It was expected that in November the number of installed spindles would pass 
the 11,000,000 mark. 

For tables showing Japanese imports, mill takings, and wharf stocks 
of cotton, see page 778. 



FRUIT , VEGETABLES, AND NUTS 

Chilean melon quota fi xe d for New York market 

The quantity of honey dew melons which may be shipped from Chile 
to New York from December 15, 1936, to April 30, 1937, has been fixed by 
the Chilean Government at 166,000 standard cases, or 9 percent more than the 
maximum fixed by the Chilean Government in the 1935-36 season, according to 
a report from Vice-Consul Camden L. McLain at Santiago, Chile. Restrictions 
on exports of melons to New York were established several years ago to safe- 
guard exporters. Shipments consigned to other American ports are not limited 
but, since there is no refrigerated service to ports other than New York, ex- 
ports to such points will be negligible, states. Mr. McLain. During the 1955-36 
season, 145,944 cases valued at $52,500 were exported to New York. This total 
is slightly below the quantities exported in preceding years. 



December 14, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



761 



CROP AND MARKET PROSPECTS, CONT'D 



Melons were planted in roost sections early in November. Consequently, 
it is too early to estimate the production but, since the melons are gro?;n on 
irrigated land and since there is little danger from unfavorable weather, 
satisfactory yields are expected. Melons are the most important fruit ex- 
ported to the United States from Chile. Some grapes, peaches, pears, plums, 
lemons, and apricots, however, were exported to the United States in 1936. 

Cuban tomato exports to be larger and of high quality 

Only medium to large tomatoes of the best quality are to be exported 
to the United States from Cuba during the 1936-37 shipping season under reg- 
ulations promulgated by the Cuban Department of Agriculture, according to 
a communication from Grant D. Clark, representative of the Bureau of Agri- 
cultural Economics at Habana, Cuba. The decree, which becomes effective 
immediately, specifies that all tomatoes offered for export to the United 
States must be larger than 7 x 7's as packed in the standard lug box. Quality 
specifications are very stringent and the resultant pack is expected to 
average substantially higher than the minimum specifications for U. 3. Jffo • 
1 grade. 

A preliminary survey indicates that the volume of exportable size 
and quality will be considerably in excess of that shipped to the United 
States during the 1935-36 season. Plantings on the Island were greatly 
increased over those of last season, but growing weather during October and 
early November was somewhat unfavorable, and exportable yields are expected 
to be less than those of a year ago. The probable lowering of exportable 
yields, however, will not fully offset the increased acreage. The produc- 
tion available for export should exceed that of last season by approximately 
25 percent. About 50 percent of the stock harvested from fields now pro- 
ducing cannot pass export standards, but the percentage of exportable stock 
should increase as fields come into production. Total exports to the United 
States this season will depend upon such factors as growing conditions during 
the next few weeks, prices received in the United States, the quantities that 
can be marketed in other countries, and whether or not even more stringent 
export regulations are put into effect at a later date. 

Harvesting began in a limited way early in November, and increased 
slowly during the month. Beginning with December, shipments to the United 
States should mount rapidly, becoming heavy the latter half of the month. 
Returns from November sales in New York were highly satisfactory. Most of 
the stock exported has shown good quality. An improvement in the quality 
of subsequent loadings is probable as a result of recent favorable growing- 
weather . 



762 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, No. 24 

CROP AND MARKET PROSPECTS, CONT'D 



LIVESTOCK, MEAT, AND V/OOL 

Danubian lard and hog prospects 

Trade arrangements "between the various Danube Basin countries and 
Germany have made it possible for the latter country to secure, through 
barter transactions during the last 4 months of this year, some 70,000 
live hogs, 60,000 hog carcases, and over 4,000,000 pounds of lard, ac- 
cording to a report from the 3elgrade office of the Bureau of Agi cultural 
Economics. Germany has also granted Hungary and Yugoslavia annual quotas 
totaling 160,000 head of killed and live hogs, 2,200,000 pounds of fat sides, 
and 40,000,000 pounds of lard. By the terms of the agreements these hog 
and pork products are to be paid for in German goods. 

Although total lard quotas alloted by Germany to Hungary and Yugoslavia 
for 1936 amounted to more than 44,000,000 pounds, these countries during the 
first 9 months of the year supplied only 19,000,000 pounds. This amount, 
however, plus 2,000,000 pounds from Bulgaria, represented 38 percent of total J 
lard imports into Germany and practically 41 percent of total lard exports 
from the Basin. The Danubian countries are not so important as sources of 
hogs and pork for Germany, nor does that country afford the chief outlet for 
these products from the Basin. During the period January-September 1936, 
however, Danubian live hogs represented 8 percent of the 56,000,000 pounds 
and Danubian fresh pork 58 percent of the 68,000,000 pounds imported into 
Germany. 

German quotas for Hungarian hogs and lard for the last half of 1936 
will not be filled because of the reduced supplies of hogs in Hungary and 
resultant higher prices than the German Livestock Monopoly will pay. 
Exports of hogs and pork products from Hungary to Germany, figures for which 
declined sharply in recent months, will probably be resumed in January. For 
a period during the summer, deliveries of hogs and lard from Yugoslavia to 
Germany were suspended pending satisfactory clearing arrangements between 
those countries. Recent Yugoslav orders for German goods, however, have 
made the resumption of Yugoslav hog and pork shipments possible. 

During October 1936, Hungary began deliveries on the 3,307,000-pound 
lard quota granted by Czechoslovakia in exchange for Czechoslovak industrial 
goods. The recent plan providing for Czechoslovak investments in Rumania 
has rnrde possible in recent months unprecedentedly large shipments of 
Rumanian lard to Czechoslovakia. The plan calls for the use of Czechoslovak 
capital in establishing a lard refinery in Rumania and for the continued 
movement of Rumanian lard and hogs to Czechoslovakia. 

The demand for Danubian lard and hogs was well sustained during the 
first three quarters of this year, and outlets existed for much larger 
quantities than were actually exported. 

Lard exports 

According to official data, 50,600,000 pounds of lard and fat backs 
were exported from Danube Basin countries during the first 9 months of 1956 



December 14, 1936 Foreign Cropfi and Markets 

CROP AND MARKET PROSPECTS, CONT'D 



763 



as compared with 46,700,000 pounds exported during the same period in 1935 
and 17,000,000 pounds during January- September 1934. Lard exports from the 
Basin during October approximated 4,630,000 pounds, which is more than monthl 
exports during the summer. See table, page 781. 

About 70 percent of the lard exports during January-September 1936 
were supplied by Hungary, 24 percent by Yugoslavia, 4.5 percent by Bulgaria, 
and 1.5 percent by Rumania. During the first 9 months of 1935, Hungary ex- 
ported 86.6 percent and Yugoslavia 13.3 percent, compared with 93.3 percent 
from Hungary in 1934 and 6.6 percent from Yugoslavia. The gradual decrease 
of Hungary's share in total lard exports from the Basin was due partly to 
the development of the lard industry in other Danubian countries under the 
influence of favorable foreign markets during 1935 and 1936, and partly to 
the reduction in 1936 of Hungarian supplies available for export. This de- 
crease in Hungary's relative participation, however, was parallel with a 
notable increase in absolute quantities exported from that country in 1935 
and 1935 as against 1934 figures. 

As a result of the depleted fat hog supplies in Hungary, lard prices 
there were above export parity during September and October. As a conse- 
quence, only a few carloads of pure lard could be exported, all of which 
went to Czechoslovakia. The same country also took normal quantities of 
Hungarian fat backs on a barter basis. As a result, total lard exports from 
Hungary during October were larger than during September. Owing to the 
absence of exports to other countries, however, October exports from Hungary 
were considerably smaller than they were a year ago. 

Exports from Yugoslavia and Rumania during October were relatively lar 
Practically all of the lard from these two countries was marketed in Czecho- 
slovakia, where the highest prices could be obtained during that month. 
At the end of October, stocks of lard were small and prices high in Hungary. 
This situation, in view of the long feeding period of Hungarian lard-type 
hogs, indicates that this year's record corn crop will probably not result 
in increased quantities of Hungarian lard for exoort before the early months 
of 1937. 

Live hog exports 

Official data show that 492,521 live hogs were exported from Danube 
Basin countries during the first 9 months of 1935 as Compared with 365,901 
during the same period a year ago and with 227,406 head in 1934. See table, 
page 781. 

Nearly 44 percent of the live hog exports during January -Sept ember 
1936 were made by Yugoslavia, 30 percent by Rumania, 26 percent by Hungary, 
and the small balance by Bulgaria. During the first 9 months of 1935, Yugo- 
slavia exported 41 percent, Rumania 23, and Hungary 35 percent, and in 1934, 
Yugoslavia 42 percent, Rumania 21 percent, and Hungary 37 percent. The 



764 



Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, No. 24 

CROP AND MARKET PROSPECTS, CONT'D 



gradual decrease of Hungary's share in total Danubian live hog exports was 
due to considerably increased Yugoslav and Rumanian exports under the in- 
fluence of satisfactory 1934 and 1935 corn crops in these two countries 
combined with favorable hog markets abroad. The decrease in Hungary's 
relative participation was, however, not accompanied by a diminution of 
live hog exports from that country. 

Fe eding activi ties 

Deeding was very active in October in the entire Basin on account 
of the harvesting of this year's large corn crops in Hungary, Yugoslavia, 
and 3ulgaria. In that month the average hog-corn ratio for the Basin as 
a whole was 13.5 as compared with about 12.83 during May- June . The improve- 
ment of the ratio during August -October was due to advancing hog prices 
rather than to cheaper corn; in spite of this year's exceptionally good corn 
crops in Bulgaria, Hungary, .and Yugoslavia, corn prices have been high owing 
to foreign demand . 

The greatly increased feeding activity was reflected in unusually 
high feeder hog prices, which have in most months since last July exceeded 
those for heavy hogs, whereas a year ago feeder prices amounted to less 
than two-thirds of the finished hog prices. The large demand for feeders 
suggests finishings in volume for the late winter months and increased 
farrowings next spring. Reports received in October indicated a scarcity 
of feeders in Hungary and that feeding estates and companies had made 
contracts for feeder hogs for delivery as late as next February, a course 
which had not been taken for years by Hungarian feeding establishments. 

United Kingdom imposes duty on beef imports 

The conclusion of a new Anglo-Argentine trade agreement, provi- 
sionally retroactive from November 20 pending ratification, has been 
announced, which will remove the important items of chilled and frozen 
beef from the free list of imports into the United Kingdom. Chilled beef 
imports from Argentina, and from all other non-Empire sources, representing 
about 93 percent of the total in the January- Sept ember 1936 period, will 
hereafter pay a duty of 0.75d. (approximately 1.5 cents) per pound. The 
increasingly heavy importations of chilled beef from Australia, New Zealand, 
and other Empire countries will continue to enter free. Foreign frozen beef, 
including boned, under the treaty will pay 0.67d. (about 2 cents) per 
pound. Non-Empire sources of this item e.re of relatively less importance 
than are Empire countries, Argentina during the first 9 months of this year 
furnishing only 5 percent of the total imports into the United Kingdom as 
compared with 93 percent from Empire countries. At the 1935 level of imports, 
the duty on chilled and frozen beef from non-Empire sources would amount to 
approximately $14,000,000. The subsidy to British beef producers, for the 
payment of which the duty may be earmarked, is set at an annual figure of 
about $25,000,000. 



December 14, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



755 



CHINA FACILITATES MOVEMENT 0? FOODSTUFFS 

The Chinese Government has recently passed regulations providing for 
freer movement of foodstuffs within the country, according to information 
received from the Shanghai office of the Bureau of Agricultural Economics . 
While the "likin" system (provincial and military irregular taxation on 
goods in transit), which formerly was common in China, was officially abolished 
by the Central Government in 1930, certain Provinces have continued from 
time to time to levy taxes on shipments of some agri cultured products under 
the pretext of preventing a food shortage within the Province. The new 
regulations are expected to encourage much greater exchange of foodstuffs 
within the country and, in the future, will be of considerable .assistance 
in securing food for deficient areas. 

The main points in the recently passed food regulations are as 
follows* (l) Free movement of foodstuffs within China is provided, and 
existing bans and provisions by Provincial Governments prohibiting or 
restricting movements of food crops from Provinces are to be removed; (2) 
no prohibitive measures against exports of foodstuffs abroad are to be made 
effective at present but, if later conditions make it necessary, exports will 
be prohibited; (3) the Agricultural Bureau of the Ministry of Industry in 
cooperation with Provincial authorities will facilitate movement of food 
crops from surplus to deficit areas; (4) the Agricultural Bureau, upon 
application to the Ministry of Railways and Communications, may secure re- 
duced freight rates on movements of food crops into deficit areas. 



UNITED STATES AGRI CULTURAL EXPORTS DURING OCTOBER 

Aided by heavier exports of cotton and leaf tobacco, the volume 
index of agricultural products for the month of October 1936 rose to 74 
percent of the pre-war average, the highest monthly index since December 1935. 

Cotton, with an index of SI, was moderately higher when compared 
with the preceding month, but showed a marked improvement over the October 
exports of 1934 and 1935, when the indexes amounted to 58 and 67, respec- 
tively. 

Tobacco mm&0 the most satisfactory showing* the index advancing to 
154, one of the threo- highest monthly indexes of the last 5 years. The 
gain may "be attributed to ^u&ually heavy exports of flue-cur^d leaf to 
the United Kingdom. The Netherlands and Sweden also increased their 
takings of flue- cured leaf • 

The index for lard, which stood at 30, was higher than for any month 
since the early part of 1935. Short supplies in this country, Coupled with 
a weak foreign demand, reduced the index of cured pork to one of the lowest 
points on record. TZheat, with an index of 22, was in a better position than 
for any month during the last 2 years. Fruits showed the usual seasonal de- 
cline, the index dropping to 211. 



766 



foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, No. 24 



TOUTED STATES AGRICULTURAL EXPORTS LURING OCTOBER, CONT'D 

July-Qcto "ber accumu l a tions 

Earm products exported from the United States during the first 4 
months of the present marketing year, July-October, were valued at 
$261,810,000, a gain of $9,000,000 over the same months of 1935, when 
the exports were valued at $252,530,000. The volume index fell from 55 
in 1935 to 54 in 1936. 

Exports of cotton were moderately larger, the total amounting to 
1,851,000 "bales valued at $117,404,000. During the same 4 months of 1935, 
exports totaled 1,812,000 bales with a value of $111,464,000. The greatest 
gain was in exports to Prance, which rose from 180,000 bales in the July- 
October period of 1935 to 317,000 hales in 1936. Exports to Japan and 
Germany were greater than last year, whereas exports to the United Kingdom, 
Italy, Spain, and Poland were less than a year ago. 

A better trend was noted in the exports of leaf tobacco, the total 
increasing from 149,403,000 pounds in the July-October period of 1935 to 
155,813,000 pounds in 1936. The greater part of this gain was in heavier 
shipments of the flue-cured leaf to British markets. Exports of other 
types of tobacco did not differ greatly from those of a year ago. 

Eor the first time in recent months, exports of lard took an up- 
ward turn, totaling 31,836,000 pounds, or more than double the exports 
for the corresponding 4 months of last season. Foreign markets absorbed 
fewer fresh apples, grapefruit, oranges, and canned fruit than in the 
July-October period a year ago but took more fresh pears and dried fruit. 



UNITED STATES: Index numbers of the volume of agricultural exports, 

adjusted for seasonal variation, October 1936, with comparisons 
(July 1909 - June 1 914 « 100 ) 



Commodity or commodity group 


1934 


1935 


1936 


Oct. 


Oct . . 


Aug. '; 


Sept . 


Oct 




61 


64 


40 1 


63 


74 


111 commodities, except cotton 


61 


53 


39 i 


44 


53 


Cotton fiber, including linters 


53 


67 


51 ' 


79 


81 


Tobacco , unmanufactured a/ .... 


150 


140 


98 


134 


154 




182 


224 


376 


327 


211 




. 18 


14 


15 


19 


22 




20 


21 


: 21 


19 


21 




22 


14 


! 15 


10 


: 9 




76 


8 


: 18 


| 22 


30 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic 
Commerce. Eor detailed figures on exports, see page 767. a/ Includes 
stems, trimmings, etc. h/ Includes ba.con, hams, shoulders, and sides. 



December 14, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 767 

UNITED STATES: Exports of principal agricultural products, 



July-Octet) 


er, 1935 s 


Jld 1936 










July-Oc 


tober 


Commodity exported 


! Unit 


Quail ti ty 


Value 






Lob 








ANIMALS AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS: 


j 






1 AAA 

1 , uuu 


1 , yyy 


Animals, live: 


; 


Thousands 


Thousands 


dollars 


dollars 


r\ — 4- J- n „ 


: No . • 


1 


1 


o n 
8 l J 


O 

°2 




: No . 


/ 

w - ■ 


/ 


4 


2 




; No . 


2 


2 


3uy 






: No . 


1 


a/- 


■184 


49 


"TV, J_ J. 


I 

: Lb , 


511 


267 


110 


92 




; Lb . 


351 


366 


76 


92 


Milk- 


* 












; Gal . 


30 


19 


17 


14 




■ Lb . 


1,072 


443 


119 


53 




| Lb. 


1,053 


1,312 


233 


271 




i Lb . 


r*j r* r— r ? 

f , OOO 


8,483 


503 


642 


Inf ants' foods, malted, etc. 


: Lb. 


72.3 


935 


213 


279 




: Do z . 


534 


534 


156 


153 


Meat s and m e at p r o due t s ! 












Beef and veal- 


; 
! 












i Lb. 


1,789 


1,404 


317 


215 


Pickled or cured 


| Lb. 


2,155 • 


4,133 


216 


327 


Canned "beef, incl. corned.. 


■ Lb. 


477 


574 


151 


173 




! Lb . 


4,421 


6 , 111 


694 


715 


Pork- 














'■ Lb. 


3 


85 


1 


11 




! Lb. 


1.281 


538 


221 


96 




> Lb . 


_ 1,284 


523 


OOO 
C- ft; dj 


107 




! Lb . 


1,561 


1, 885 


311 


316 




: Lb. 


15,830 


13,991 


3,381 


3,056 


Sides, Cumber. & Wiltshire 


; Lb. 


185 


237 


38 


34 


Pickled or salted 


: Lb. 


1,819 


4,785 


248 


531 




j Lb. 


2.782 


2,295 . ; 


1.015 


012 




! Lb. 


2ii 561 


23 . 816 




.1 O C G 
4 , O OD 


H IT- ■ 4- 4« — , u „j "1 "L- 


; Lb. 


157 


.134 ■ 


29 


27 




; Lb . 


702 


483 


153 


107 


Sausage - 


• 












: Lb. 


301 


364 


78 


102 




i Lb. 


4-23 


386 


98 


81 


Other meats- 












Fresh, frozen, or cured . . . 


i Lb. 


4,818 


6 ,726 


613 


870 


Canned, incl. canned 














j Lb. 


345 


569 


88 


122 




: Lb. 


. 35.728 


38.689 


6,958 


5,390 


Meat extracts and bouillon 














: Lb. 


44 


25 


68 


46 




: Lb. 


9,809 


9,594 


2,019 


2,078 



Continued - 



768 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33,. Ho. 24 



UNITED STATES: Exports of principal agricultural' products, 

July-October, 1935 and -.1936, cont'd 



W. - ■ ..... 






July-October 


Commodity exported 


\ 


Unit 


Quantity 


Vali 


ie 








1935 


-1936 


1935 


1935 


ANIMALS -AND ANIMAL. PROD . CONT 


'D: j 








1 , 000 • 


.1,000 


Oils and fats, animal: 






Thousands 


Thousands 


dollars : 


dpllars 




• 


Lb. 


12,567 


31,836 


' '1,819' : 


3,772 






Lb... 


177 


249' 


28 


' ' .'. ,32 






Lb. 


3,318 


3,127 


397 ' : 


292 




• 


Lb. 


1,446 


• • '1,554 


164 i 


149 ■ 


Stearins and fatty acids . . 




Lb. 


1,102 


1,077 


86-'! 


' .82 




• 


Lb. 


■202 


t . . . - ?62 


'18'; 


49 


Other animal oils and fats 


« • • ! 


Lib. 


4,852 


' 3 r 265 


367 : 


238 




: 


LTd. 


_ 23,664 


41.970 


2.879 ; 


. 4,614 


VEGETABLE PRODUCTS: 


* 










Cotton. unmfd. (Bales of 500 lb 


0 j 












Raw, except linters ....... 


• . . 


Bale 


1,812 


• ■ 1,851 


■ 111,464 


' 117,404 






Bale 


87 


96 


2, Oil 


2,368 


Eruits : 


; 












Apple s~ 


; 
















Bskt 


562 


83 


1,197 


146 ' 






Box 


1,958 


1,678 


3,174 


2, 555 




1 


Bblv 


551 


. • ' ■ 166 


' . 2,434 


681 




■ 


Lb. 


8,348 


10,409 


699 


933 






Lb. ■ 


16,142 


20,503 


2,254 


2,583 




• 


Box- 


314 


159 


723 


449 






Box 




1,055 


5,541 


3,254 




■ 


Lb. 


79,634 


95,713 


3,214 


3, 551 




1 


; - Lb. 


46,693 


75,951 


2,103 


3,914 




', 


Lb. 


39,912 


'56,128' 


1,832 


3 , 003 




• 


Lb . ■ 


144,975 


113,795 


10,637 


9,957 


Nut-S4- 


; 
















Lb. 


79 


841 


30 


146 






Lb . 


8,719 


10,713 


873 


1,032 


ILrains. flour and meal: 














; 


Bu. 


4,211 


' '3,601 


' 2,254 


2/588 


Buckwheat, excluding flour 


. . • < 


Bu. 


n/ 

a/ 


a/ 


■ a/ 


aJ 


Corn, including corntneal . . 


'• 


' Bu. 


Pi 1 




P5P- 


'• 31 3 




I 


x>U . 


: li 


14 


1 7 


' 17 ' 

J- I 




; 


JdU . 


. 436 


' 308 


458 . 


■ 497 


R.ice, including flour, meal 


; 
















Lb.. 


32,790 


2,402 


965 


: 92 






Bu. 


: 3 




! 4 


! ' *f* 






Bu. 


: . 101 


1,661 


79 


j 1,609 


TJheat flour- 














T7holly of U.S. wheat .... 




Bbl. 


: 310 


452 


1,385 


; 2,036 






Bbl. 


: 800 


877 


3,580 


I 4,304 


Tot a], wheat flour 




Bbl. 


: l.iio 


. 1,329 


5.065 


I ' 5,340 






Bu. 


5,318 


7,906 


' ' 5 , 144 


! 7 , 949 



Conti 



nued - 



December 14, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 769 

UNITED STATES: Exports of principal agricultural products, 

July-October, 1935 and 1936, cont'd 



Commodity exported ; Unit 



VEGETABLE PRODUCTS, CONT'D: \. 

Oilseed 'products^ I 

Cottonseed cake and meal ... : L.ton 

Linseed cake and meal ; L.ton 

Cottonseed oil, crude : Lb. 

Cottonseed oil, refined .... : Lb. 

.1} Sugar (2,000 lbs.) S Ton 

Tobacco leaf: « 

Bright flue-cured • Lb. 

Burley : Lb. 

Dark fired Ky. & Tennessee.. j Lb. 

Dark Virginia ; Lb. 

Maryland and Ohio export ... I Lb. 

G-reen River (Pryor) • Lb. 

One- sucker leaf • Lb. 

Cigar leaf j Lb. 

Black fat, water baler and ; 

dark African . • ! Lb. 

Perique ' I Lb. 

Total leaf tobacco : Lb. 

Tobacco stems, trimmings and • 

scrap ; Lb. 

Vegetables : >' 

Beans, dried ! Lb. 

Peas, dried ! Lb. 

Onions : Lb. 

Potatoes, white ; Lb. 

Vegetables, canned i Lb. 

Misc. vegetable products: ; 

Drugs, herbs, roots, etc. .. ; Lb. 

G-lucose ; Lb. 

Hops : Lb. 

Starch, corn . . ' Lb. 

TOTAL PRINCIPAL AGRICULTURAL • 

PRODUCTS : 



TOTAL AG-RI CULTURAL PRODUCTS .. 
TOTAL EXPORTS, ALL COMMODITIES 



J uly-October 



Qu antity ; Value 



1955 


1936 


1935 


1936 






-L , uuu , 


X , uuu 


j^nous ands 


I nous anas 


do liars 


o.o x iars 


A 




O ( 


DO 


CO 

by 


ox 


1 A K ' 


1 ART 


ol 


o b 


O 


\ A 


1,252 


' 893 


148 


103 


52 


27 


2,350 


1,162 


125,269 


133, 623 


55,968 


55,167 


2,785 


2,895 


655 


529 


11, 553 


; 9,245 


1,715 


1,266 


2,848 


j 3,050 


793 


715 


1,538 


i 1,489 


475 j 


319 


706 


1,286 


61 


nil 

111 


711 


351 


60 


36 


274 


201 


170 • 


109 


3,705 


: 3,632 


615 


625 


_ ._J_4_ 


41 


5 


13 


1 AQ Am 


.., lOiu Q lO 


en c^i i i 
o,U , 0 ,1 ' . 


co pan 


~\ 1 OR 
1 , iOD 


o, 314 


2b . 


loo 


2,207 


1,982 


• 87 • 


79 


941 


1.962 


j 44 i 


65 


14,325 


19, 817 


256 ; 


282 


75,841 


51 , 730 


753 ; 


927 


13,434 


14,403 


1,362 ; 


1,476 


1,706 


2,029 


415 j 


781 


7,893 


10,377 


212 : 


307 


1,247 


335 


215 : 


84 


V?. S.70 


_ 11 . 844 


442 


403 




239,709 : 


245,317 






252,530 1 


261,810 






751,772 j 


831, 543 



.! Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. 
I a/ Less than 500. 

Includes paddy in terms of cleaned. 



770 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 3.3, Wo. 24 



UNITED STATES: Export quantity of specified agricultural products, 
January-October, 1935 and 1936, and October 1935 and 1936 







: January- 


October 


; October 


Commodity 


Unit 


> 












• 1935 


; 1936 


: 1935 


« 1936 . 






■Thousands 


'Thousands 


T'Vi r\ \ t o o vi iA c" 
i J.J1U 'J-bcLilQb 


' rnV^iii r* or! r'< 
1 _L ii'J LLo d.1 1- Q-> 


TPVOf^ EPIC T>r>T T 771 cm T . 

EA.UKrs, DL)i lie i 10 : 














I Lb . 


j 5,383 


• 3,599 


, o oo 


• '^7 


Hams and shoulders a/ 


'. Lb. 


: 47,424 


j 36,013 


! r ^ lop 


; 1,897 




Lb. 


i 80,569 


1 92,345 


; 2,731 


j 10,454 


Grains and "oreioaratioris : 






i 








Bu. 


5,396 


j 7,165 




; 4^4 




PL. 


162 


j 512 


' 6 


; 23 


Rice- 














Lb. 


121, 653 


11,388 


14 , 749 


' 1 736 




Lb . 


491 


: 54 


% 


. c/ 


wneat— 














Bu. 


170 


1, 808 


14 


■ 926 


Elour wholly of 












united States wheat.... ; 


Bbl. 


819 


851 


78 


'< 86 


Fruits: « 












Fresh— ! 












Apples : 


' Bu. 


8,356 


6,966 


? 190 


1 420 


Pears : 


Lb. 


92,268 


' 110,727 


^7 525 


: 36,659 


Oranges i 


Box 


5,028 


3,774 


?82 


; 125 


Grapefruit j 


Box 


926 


766 


Do 


, 01 


Dried- ; 












Apples . . . . ■ 


Lb. 


19,441 


19 , t6 54 


4,979 


5,798 


At) t i co 1 3 ! 


Lb. 




?4 871 


3 , 543 


2,446 


Prunes ! 


Lb. 


107, 686 


156, 855 


20,473 


31,555 


Raisins ! 


Lb. 


70, 110 


85,722 


19,196 


25,270 


Canned pears \ 


Lb 


63 , 1 72 


56 374 i 


18,823 


8,121 


Tobacco leaf: : 














Lb. i 


199,822 


241,359 


53,991 


57,088 


Dark- fired Kentucky j 














Lb. : 


44, 756 


44,811 ; 


2,687 i 


2.319 




Lb . ; 


33,735 


34.913 ... 


.3,520... 


. , 3,645 




Lb. : 


278,313 


321.080 : 


60.068 : 


65.052 


Cotton, er.cl. linters ! 












Bale : 


3 , 840 


4,125 : 


712 : 


861 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
a/ Includes Cumberland and Wiltshire sides, 
b/ Includes paddy in terms of cleaned. 
cj Less than 500. 



December 14, 193^ Foreign Crops and Markets 771 



U2II TED STATES: Imports (for consumption) of principal agricultural products, 

July-October, 1935 and- 1936 









-July-October 




Commodity imported 


: Unit 


: Quan 


tity 


: Va 


lue 




: 1935 


: 1936 


: 1933 


; 1936 


COivIPETITI VE 








: 1,000 


: 1,000 


ANIMALS AND ANIMAL PPODUCTS: 




: Thousands 


! Thousands 


; dollars 


• dollars 


Animals, live: 














: No. 


: 81 


! 98 


: 2,032 


: 2,391 


Hogs, (except for breeding).. 


: Lb. 


: 1,766 


i 4,766 


J 159 


i 397 


Horses 


: No. 


• 3 


: 4 


i 327 


J 630 


Dairy products: 














: Lb. 


s 557 


: 2,678 


: 99 


: 616 




: Lb. 


: U69 


5,5^6 


: 32 


: 494 


Cheese- 














: Lb. 


: 2,215 


: 2,645 


: 600 


! 736 




: Lb. 


: a/ 


: 5,822 


l 6,1 


* 859 




: Lb. 


! 13,912 


: 14.920 


: 3.080 


: _.3^0J9_ 




: Lb. 


: 16,127 


! 23,387 


: 3. 680 


: 4,694 




: Gal. 


: - / 


: 19 


: 


: 28 


Mi Ik- 












Condensed and evaporated... 


: Lb. 


: 235 


• 987 


: 8 


: 44 




: Lb. 


; 930 


: 8,449 


! 56 


: 432 


Whole, sk. and "buttermilk.. 


: Gal . 


5 


i 25 


; 1 


: g 


Eftss and egg products: 














: Doz . 


9S 


: 141 


: .18 


: 21 




: Lb. 


: 716 


i 1,021 


! 323 


:• 404 


Yolks, dried 


: Lb. 


1 , 522 


i 1,991 


t • 207 


!' 277 




: Lb. 




i 460 


: ' bl 


: 84 




: Lb. . 


t 101,700 




» 15.^70 


: 16,150 


Meats and meat products: ! 












Beef and veal- 














Lb. : 


• 3.190 


: 1,154 


i 200 . 


: 101 




Lb. 


3^3 


791 


25 • 


: 64 




Lb. : 


12 : 


8 ' 


2 


! 1 


Pork- : 














Lb. . 


' 2,043 : 


4,430 


281 - 


586 


-Hams, shoulders and "bacon., i 


Lb. : 


2,314 ! 


l S,S12 . 


497 i 


2,359 


Pickled, salted and other.. : 


Lb. I 


562 ! 


927 : 


131 i 


234 




Lb . ! 


204 : 


690 1 




ikh 


Meats, canned- ; 












Beef, including corned t Lh. i 


24,091 * 31 #875 ( l,7?-8 « 2,97^ 


Other canned S 


Lb. : 


840 i 


34 ! 


m. i 


m 




Lb. ; 


24. m 3 


31.909 ; 


1,755 ! 


2. 9 So 


Other meats- : 












Presh : 


Lb. ! 


242 J 


127 : 


30 s 


25 




Lb. : 


0 : 


0 : 


0 : 


0 




Lb. : 


33,241 : 


48.848 : 


2.981 : 


6,502 




Lb. : 


4,192 : 


4,887 •* 


1,981 : 


1,974 


Tallow : 


Lb. : 


75,726 : 


43,003 i 


4,364 : 


2,064 


Wool, unmfd., except free J 














Lb. : 


17,145 : 


28,590 : 


3,039 : 


6,793 



Continued - 



77? 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, No. ?\ 



UNITED STATES: 



Imports (for consump 
July- 



Commodity imported 



uiupoion) of principal agricultural products, 
tober, 1935 and 193S, cont'd 



Unit 



July-Octo"ber 



Q uantity 



2335- 



2331 



Value 



J335l 



C OMPETITIV E , CONT'D 
VEGETABLE PRODUCTS: 

Coffee imported into P.R 

Cotton , unmfd. (kjS lb. bale) 

Raw, except linkers 

Linters « 

R eeds and fodders : 

Beet pulp, dried (2,25+0 lb.).. 
Bran, shorts, etc.— 

Of direct import (2,25+0 lb.) 
Withdrawn bonded mills " 
Total bran, shorts, etc." 

Hay (2,000 pound) 

Oil cake and oil-cake meal- 
Bean (Soy) 
Coconut . . 
Cottonseed 
Linseed . . 
All other 

Total oil cake and meal 
Eruits: 



Berries, natural state 
Currants 
Dates , 
Eigs . 
Grapes 
Lemons 
Limes , 



Pineapples- 
Fresh 

Prepared or preserved 
Product of the P.I . 

Raisins 

Olives in brine .... 
Gr ain s rmd grain product 

Barley, grain 

Barley, malt 

Corn, grain 

Oats, grain 

Rice- 

Uncleaned 



Cleaned or milled 

Patna 

Meal, flour and broken 
Rye, grain 



Lb. 

Bale 
Bale 

Ton 

Ton 
Ton 
Ton 
Ton 



Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
j_ib • 
Lb. 
Lb. 



Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb . 
Lb. 
Cn.ft 
Lb. 
Lb. 



Lb, 
Lb. 
Lb. 

Gal, 



Bu. 
Lb. 
Bu. 
Bu. 

Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Lb. 
Bu. 



Tho us ands 
150 



Thousands 



a/' 



30 



6 

86 
_2J_ 



111 



1 

7,1549 

Ul,12S 

5+.501 
1,208 



56,5'^ 



3,25+9 
i+,0S8 

28,315 
5+,101 
1 
1+ 

5+,05^ 

c/ 
1,870 

1,939 
UU3 

1,805 

391 
113,676 
21,879 
5+2 

5+1+0 
1,570 
65S 

5+,i77 
2,090 



0 

'55+ 
IS 

10 

107 

_3k 



ll+l 



.5+ 



10,5+19 
23,536 
13,106 
20,705 
5.109 



5,313 

3,975 
3i,oUi 

3,53S 
1 

535+ 
5 , 128 

0/ 
5,75+7 
8,156 

337 
1,613 

5^,899 
111,9*2 

15,116 

37 

.1,005 
3,5+15 

215 
3^,858 
2,828 



1,000 
dollars 
17 

2,05+8 

a/ 

129 

1,622 
559 



2,131 



10 

71 
5+02 

23 
5+0 
11 



_5iL7_ 



212 
227 
985 
263 
3 

£/ 
105+ 

55 
92 
97 
39 

967 

295+ 
3,122 
9,622 
IS 



5+2 

26 
67 

983 



Continued - 



December 14, 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



773 



UNITED STATES: Imports 



for con sump ti 
July-Octob 



on) of principal agricultural products 
er, 1935 and 1936, cont'd. 



Commodity imported 



Unit 



COMP ETITIVE , CONT'D j 
VEGETABLE PRODUCTS, CONT'D: j 
Grains and grain prod., cont'd : j 
Wheat, grain- 
Dutiable at 42^ per "bu, . . . : 
Dutiable at 10$ ad val. d/ ; 
Milled in bond for export- ; 

To Cuba . . j 

To other countries j 

Total wheat grain ..... I 

Wheat flour .' 

Wheat including flour : 

Nuts and preparations ; 

Oils , vegetable : • 

Coconut oil j 

Corn oil : 

Cottonseed oil : 

Linseed oil i 

Olive oil, edible . . j 

Olive oil, inedible j 

Palmkernel oil j 

Palm oil j 

Peanut oil : 

Perilla oil j 

Rape seed oil ; 

Soybean oil j 

Sunflower seed oil j 

Tung oil • 

Oilseeds : j 

Castor beans : 

Copra • 

Flaxseed , • 

Palm nuts and kernels • 

Sesame seed ' 

Seeds, except oilseeds j 

Sugar and mo las se s : '. 

Sugar ( 2 ,000 pound) j 

Molasses ; 

Tobacco, unmanufactured: ; 

Leaf | 

Product of the P.I \ 

Stems , not cut : 

Vegetables : i 
Beans- i 

Dried '; 

Green or unripe ■ 



July-Oc tober 



Quantity 





: 1935 


1936 


: 1935 


: 1936 








: 1,000 


. 1,000 




Thousands 


;Thousands 


; dollars 


■ dollars 


Bu. 


9,653 


i 16,187 


7,347 


; 15,332 


Bu. 


2,679 


j. 3,379 


j. .2,684 


; 2,685 


Bu. 


1,267 


; 1,055 


\ 1,114 


■ n a t 


Bu. 


2,450 


3, 374 


1,889 


* ty * *7 r\ 

6 , 360 


Bu. 


16,049 


23 ,99 5 


13 , 034 


; 21,990 


Bbl. ■ 


4 


23 


15 


\ 86 


Bu. 


16 , 067 


24, 102 


13 , 049 


22,076 




/ 

c/ 


2./ 


6 , 189 


7,085 


Lb. 


109 , 720 


87 , 304 


4 , 385 


r-7 nor? 
6 , loo 


Lb. 


8 , 160 


9 , 593 


49 5 


bbl 


Lb. 


46, 709 


36 , 003 


2, 765 


2 , 019 


Lb . 


500 


172 


21 


9 


Lb. 


24,381 


20 , 885 


2 ,990 


, 562 


Lb. 


18 ,497 


9 , 786 


1 , 221 


811 


Lb. 


22,990 


5,071 


- 949 


219 


Lb. 


99 ,989 


108,855 


3 , 024 


3,499 


Lb. 


16 ,950 


4 , 981 


780 


312 


Lb. 


27,342 


36,733 


1 , 628 


2 , 371 


Gal . 


2,760 


3 , 199 


1 , 084 


1 , 510 


Lb. 


4,014 


1 , 116 


183 


08 


Lb. 


7,557 


11 ,484 


487 


730 


Lb. 


47,906 


36,720 


5,821 


5,744 


Lb. 


35,207 


32 , 762 


835 


740 


Lb. 


167,872 


158 , 647 


3,926 


3,517 


Bu. 


5,622 ' 


4,347 


5,017 


5,511 


Lb. ; 


8 , 487 ' 


8 , 804 


163 


167 


Lb. ■ 


3,608 : 


15,004 


114 


505 




§ \ 


c/ 


1,048 * 


1,883 


Ton . 


1,161 


753 : 


55,^42 j 


43 , 249 


Gal. : 


80,177 ; 


97.121 


4,223 


5 , 212 


Lb. 


21,673 j 


21,841 ; 


9,887 ! 


11,688 


Lb. - 


892 j 


679 j 


83 • 


58 


Lb. ; 


666 j 


652 ; 


24 ; 


24 


Lb. : 


8,720 : 


10,468 : 


221 j 


317 


Lb. 


39 ' 


31 ! 


o '■ 


1 



Value 



Continued - 



774 Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, No. 24 



■ TOUTED STATES: Imports (for consumption) of principal agricultural products, 



July-October 


1935 and 


1936, cont'd 










Ju.lv- 


-October 




Commodity imported 


: Unit 


I Onantitv 




: 1935 


1936 


: 1955 


■ 1936 


competitive, cont'd 








1,000 


: 1,000 


VEGETABLE PRODUCTS , CONT'D: 




: Thousands 


Thousands 


dollars 


dollars 


Vegetables, cont'd. 












Chickpeas or garbanzos, dried. 


| Lb. 


3 , 413 


4,039 


111 


■ 149 




' Lb. 


: ■ 1,850 


; 1,047 


125 


■ 46 




. Lb. 


: 2,371 


' 1,202 


51 


; 27 


Peas, except cowp's & chickp's- 














Lb. 


■ -1,585 


; . 541 


47 


: : 15 




. Lb. 


: ■ 1 


3 


y 


! w 




Lb. 


\ ■ 160 


! 7,703 


2 


: 152 


Tapi oca- 














Lb. 


; 492 


3,036 


9 


! 56 




Lb. 


65, 755 


83,370 


1,424 


' 1,698 




Lb. 


1 


; 3 




I b/ 




Lb. 


24,961 


; 37,649 


136 


: 269 




Lb. 


22 , 520 


j 25,124 


943 


; 1,029 


Fibers, vegetable: (2,240 lb. ton} 












Ton 


1 


■ o 


679 


520 


Jute and jute butts, unmfd. .. 


Ton 
Ton 


16 


b/ 

~ 12 


55 
1,150 


: 50 
: 916 


Total principal competitive 










agricultural nro ducts 








187,540 


203 f 810 


HON- COi :pet I T rvs 













ANIMAL PHO DUCTS: 














Lb. 


14,996 


22,207 


35,556 


35, 728 




Lb. 


67,425 


48,222 


9, 618 


j 8 , 570 


VEGETABLE PRODUCTS: 














Bunch. 


19,507 


21,867 


9,774 


10,469 


Coffee, ex. into Puerto Rico ... 


Lb. 


583,965 


487,700 


41,331 


37, 146 




Lb. 


160,824 


178,138 


6,796 


: 9,454 




Lb. 


30 , 134 


31,071: 


5, 658 


6,449 




Lb. 


37,745 


d 


2,780 


2,444 




Lb. 


26,489 


45,375 


2,837 


4,059 


Fibers, vegetables: (2,240 lb. ton] 












Ton 


2 


5: 


492 


1,298 




Ton 


16 


9: 


1,231 


1,316 




Ton- 


57 


37: 


4,044 


4,047 


Rubber, ciude, incl. guayule * * . 
Total principal agricultural- 


Lb. - 


3fi?., 626 


. 387,725; 


40., 30 7_ 


5.8,832. 






160,924 


179,873 










187, 540 


203,810 


TOTAL PRINCIPAL AGS I. PBOD. 








348,464 : 


383.683 


TOTAL AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS 








382,169 : 


432 , 574 


TOTAL IMPORTS . ALL COMMOT) TT IF.S.1 * 








711,966 


828.229 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
a/ Not separately classified prior to January 1, 1936. b/ Less than 500. 
c_l Reported in value only, d/ Unfit for human consumption. 



December 14* 1936 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



775 



UNITED STATES: Import quantity of specified agricultural products, 
January-October, 1935 and 1936, and October, 1935 and 1936 



Commodity 



Unit 



January-October 



1935 



1936 



October 



1935 



1936 



IMPORTS EOrl CONSUMPTION: 

Cattle, live 

Beef, canned, 

Including corned .... 

Butter 

Cheese . .." 

Egg products, excluding 
eggs in the shell 

Tallow 

Wool a/ 



Grains : 
Wheat b/ 
Corn 
Oats 

Bye 

Barley malt 
Flaxseed . . 
Copra 



Vegetable o 



Coconut 

Palm . . . 

Tung . . . 

Perilla 
Sugar, raw (2,000 pounds) 
Molasses . 





* ^hous Pi n d ^ 


, -L J-lv l-*-0 ClJ-X H O 


J.11U 'J.O CXll u.3 




No . 


! 311 


■ ^8^ 




, Cj x. 


Lb. 


: 62 , 585 


; 82 300 


' 5 379 


! 8,994 


Lb. 


; 22,057 


j ' 7,358 


: 108 


\ 648 


Lb. : 


40 , 032 


; 47,739 


' F> 01 S 




Lb. 


P 477 


7 07fi 


DO O 




Lb. 


??7 0^1 


• 77 App 




' 1 D7Q 


Lb. 


33, 176 


; 07 iqc 

, J \ j X «y »J 




• 7 m r 


3u. : 


18,770 


33,085 


5,324 


4,191 


Bu. : 


39 , 500 


| 20,778 


'4, 590 


• 8,122 


Bu. : 


10,097 


: 82 


4 


22 




9, 640 


. 2,982 


204 


'794 


Lb. • 


286,004 


234,046 


16,933 


26,200 


Bu. ; 


3 4, 616 


11,170 


930 


1,747 


Lb. j 


344,349 


345,242 


. 54 ,-5866 


44,371 


Lb. j 


286,298 


260, 167 


31,056 


23,500 


Lb. : 


236, 677 


274,683 , 


20,923 


28,074 


Lb. i 


101,389 


120,037 - 


10,679 : 


5,271 


Lb.- i 


67,074 


117,^03 ; 


4,651 : 


0 


Ton : 


2,850 I 


2,707 ; 


92 •' 


.92 


Gal . S 


230, 141 : 


206,807 


16,800 •' 


23,79'5 



Compiled from official records of the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
a/ Excludes wool imported -free in bond for use in carpets, etc 
b/ Includes only wheat full duty paid and 10 percent ad valorem. 



776 



Foreign Crops and Markets Vol. 33, N5. 24 

WHEAT: Closing prices of May futures 



Date 



Chicago 'Kansas city' Minneapolis 
1935: 1936: 1935: 1936: 1935: 1936 



Winnipeg a/ 



1935: 1936 



Liverpool a/ B^nos 
•Aires b/ 
1935: 1936: 1935: 1936" 



Cents: Cents: Cents: Cents 

120 :d/ 82:d/l0l 

110 : d/ 66:d/ 91 

112 :e/ 68: e/ 92 

114 :e/ 71 : e/ 93 

116 :e/ 73: e/ 94 

120 iff 69 ;f/ 91 



High c/. 
Low _c/ . 
Nov. 14 

21 

28 

Dec. 5 



C ent s : Cent s ; Cent s : Cents; Cents : Cents 

121 : 108 : 116 : 122 : 130 

112 : 94 : 108 ■ 104 : 120 

114 : 96 : 111 ; 110 : 124 

116 : 100 : 112 : 111 : 126 

118 : 97 : 113 : 108 : 127 

121 : 96 : 115 : 106 : 129 



Cents: Cents 



106 
94 
97 

100 

97 
96 



99 
86 
89 
91 

88 
87 



114 
106 

107 

108 
110 
114 



"9T 
81 

84 
87 
86 
84 



a/ Conversions at noon buying rate 
other prices. cj October 1 to date 
ber futures, fj February futures. 



of exchange, 
d/ Decerab 



b/ pricey are of day previous to 
er and February futures. ej Decem- 



WHEAT: Weekly weighted average cash price at stated markets 





AH 


classes 


■ No . 


2 


No. 1 


' No. 


2 Hard 


: No. 


2 


: Western 


Week 


land grades 


Hard 


Winter 


;Dk.N. Soring 


Amber 


Durum 


Red Winter 


White 


ended 


: six 


markets 


: Kansa 


9 City 


:Minneapoli s 


Mi nne 


apoli s 


St. 


Loui s 


• Seattle a/ 




















Cent 


a: Cent s 


C en t s 


: Cents 


Cents 


: Cents 


Cents 


: Cents 


Cents: 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


High b/ . . 


• 112 


: 132 : 


123 


: 128 


139 


• 150 


121 


: 175 


113 : 


127 


90 


99 


Low jby . . : « 


96 


: 126 


109 


: 120 


125 ; 


139 


108 


: 135 


102 : 


118 


82 


96 


Nov. 14.. 


96 


: 129 : 


111 


: 121 


• 125 


: 144 


115 


: 153 


102 : 


121 


82 : 


sJ 


21.. : 


99 


: 127 • 


114 


: 123 • 


131 


144 


114 


: 143 


105 : 


124 


84 


c/ 


28. . 


• 99 


: 126 


113 


: 123 • 


131 


141 • 


114 


: 135 


105 : 


123 . 


84 




Dec. 5. . ■ 


98 


: 130 ■ 


109 


: 128 


128 


139 : 


108 


: 175 


102 : 


127 ■ 


83 • 





date, c/ No quotations since October 30 because of strike. 

WHEAT: Price per bushel at specified European markets, 1935-36 and 1936-37 







: Rotterdam 


: Berlin 




: England 


Year 
beginning 
July 


\ Range 


Hard 
Winder 


•Manitoba 


Argentina 


Australia 


c/ 


' Paris 


: and 
: Wales 




No. 2 


1 No. 3 


'—d 


of 




lone st Id 




1935-36 d/ 




Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents i 


Cents 


Cents 


High 


103 


104 


: 91 


95 


229 


154 


81 




Low ; 


74 


82 


63 


71 


209 ; 


121 


59 


1936-37 d/ 


High 


. 120 ; 


131 


119 ; 


128 ; 


233 : 


204 : 


'. 117 




Low 


101 


99 


99 • 


100 : 


209 : 


179 


91 


Oct. 22... 




ej 117 


127 . . 


117 


: 125 . 


212 : 




113 


29. . . 




ej 114 


126 


113 . 


122 : 


212 : 




117 


Nov . 5 . . . 




J 113 


121 ' 


112 


; 121 : 


214 : 




115 


12. . . 




e/ 114 : 


120 


112 , 


119 


214 : 




113 


19. . . 




e/ US : 


122 ; 


114 : 


120 


215 




111 



Prices at Paris areof day previous to other prices, prices in England and Wales 
are for week ending Saturday. Conversions made at current exchange rates, 
a/ Barasso. b/ F.A.Q. cf Producer's fixed orice from August 16, 1934. d/ July 
1 to date. e/ Nominal. 



December 14, 1936 



Foreign Crons and Markets 



777 



FEED GRAINS AND RYE: Weekly average price per bushel of corn, rye, oats, 









Corn 




j 


Rye ; 


Oats : 


Barley 


Week 


: Ch icago 


sBuenosAir es 


:Minnoapol is 


: Chicago 


.Minneapolis 


ended 


No. 3 














: No . 


3 2 








: Yellow 


Futures 


\ Fut.i 


ires 


No. 


o 

i d | 


: White ; 


No. 2 




• 1935 


: 1936: 


1935 


: 1936 


i 1935; 


1936- 


1935: 


1936 


. 1935 


. 1936; 


193 5 


1936 




Cents- 


: Cents 


:Cent s; 


Cents 


[Cent Si 


Cents: 


Cent s: 


Cents; 


Cents; 


Cents; 


Cents : 


Cents 


High b/ .. 


: 96 : 


: 118 


i 62 


: 108 


. AO • 


f ;56 ! 


. 80 


98 


: 58 : 


47 


• 113 


. 133 


Low b/ 


> 50 : 


59 


: 56 : 


: 94 


; 37 : 


r 47 : 


42 .' 


48 . 


: 27 • 


25 : 


: 41 : 


58 








: Dec.. 


: Dec. 


i Dec.: 


Jan . • 














Nov. 7 ... 


. 63 


: 104 - 


: 59 j 


: 93 


: 37 : 


43 : 


• 49 ; 


• 86 


: 29 


: 45 ; 


• 60 


: 125 


14 


: 65 


: 110 


: 60 < 


• 102 


: 37 ; 


' 47 : 


• 49 : 


j 89 : 


' 29 


: 45 


: 55 : 


128 


21 ...: 


66 


; 108 


: 61 ■ 


• 105 


i 37 : 


47 • 


: 49 :! 


• 94 : 


• 29 


: 46 • 


54 ; 


. 127 














Feb . 














28 ... 


58 


104 




105 


: 37 : 


48 


. 48 • 


95 


: 29 


, 47 


47 


: 128 


Dec. 5 ... 


'~J %J 


. 105 


: 53 : 


103 


: 37 • 


49 • 


: 47 


: 98 


: 28 


: 47 


: 55 


: 128 



a/ Cash pr ices are weighted averages of reported sales; future prices 
averages of daily quotations, b/ For period January 1 to latest date 



re simple 
hown . 



FEED 'CHAINS: Movement from principal exporting countries 



Commodity ] 

and 

country \ 


Exports j 
for year : 


Sh ipment s 193 6 , : 
week ended a/ 


Exports as far 
: as reported 


1934-35] 


1935-36-1 


Nov. 21' 


.Nov. 28' 


Dec. 5' 


Jul:/ 1 
: to 


1935-36 
: V 


: 1936-37 
: b/ 


BARLEY , EXP OR IB : c/: 
United Status 

Argentina < 

Danube and USSR. . ; 


1,000 : 
bushels : 


1,000 : 
bushels ; 


1,000 : 
bushels : 


1,000 - 
bushels: 


1,000 : 
bushels ; 


: Dec. 5 
Oct. 31 
: Nov. 23 
' Dec 5 


1,000 
-bushels ; 


: 1,000 
bushels 


: 4,050: 
14,453 
\ 20,739; 
: 11,250- 


: 9 , 886 : 
£ 6,8822 
; 9,468: 
; 37,375 


0 

133 : 
• 1,139: 


: . 0: 

: 358: 
: ( 1 , 039 ; 


0 

: 404 


[ 5,503 
[ 2,820* 
: 2,771- 
: 31,337 


: 3,938 
• 10,630 
: 3,475 
: 18,275 


• 50,492; 


t 63,611; 










! 42,435 


: 36,318 


OATS, EXPORTS J cj ; 
United States . . . ; 

Argentina : 

Danube and USSR. . 
'Poij o.X ••••*«»•• 
CORN, EXPORTS: d/ 
United States . . 
Danube and USSR.,! 

Argentina 

South Africa .... 


1,147 
17,407- 
: 43,753: 
f 8,444: 


! 1,429s 
: 14,892: 
9,790; 
! 2.847 


0 

[ : 
: 213: 
i 0: 


t 1: 

[ 1,254 
! 0 


: 0 

! 334- 
0 


: Dec 5' 
: Oct. 31: 
; Dec. 5 
1 Dec. 5 


[ 486 
: 5,058. 
? 6,210: 
S 1,390: 


[ 312 
: 4,4C9 
: 6,346 

: 300 


: 70,751 


! 28,953; ; ; 




t • 13,144- 


• 11,367 


: 830: 
i 14,939: 
;256,143: 
: 21,882 


: i : 

l 863! Os $ 
[ 14,96^: 170; 1.003; 
[307,362: 3,527: ^,327; 
[ 8,910: 25: 774: 


2; 

1 6,551- 

: 66 


[Nov.lto 
[~D'ocT] 
i Dec 5: 
: Dec 5: 
\ Dec 5j 


» 1 

► t 

i 2: 
: 1,702: 
! 29,700: 
: 2,958 


4 

2,083 
: 43,334 
t 1,505 


To1j el ■•**••••« 

United States 


: 29 3, 844 


[332,141; 




1 i» t 
* # I 


: 34,362: 46,976 


: 41,141 


► m 
i • 

: 24,521: 




* 


•* • 
* # 

• 
• 



Compiled from official and 
nearest to the date shown, 
beginning November 1. 



b/ Preliminary, c/ Year beginning July 1. d/ Year 



778 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, No. 24 



JAPAN: Raw cotton imports, September-October 1936 
(in bales of 500 pounds) 



1956 





Type 




uc x o uer 


Sep t emb er— 0 c t ober 








Bales 


: Bales 


United States 






47,000 


: 74,000 








'73,000 : 


208,000 








4,000 : 


9,000 








16,000 : 


23,000 








59 ,000 ' \ 


139,000 








199,000 1 


; 453,000 



Compiled from Japanese official figures. 



JAPAN: Mill takings of cotton, October 1935, with comparisons 

(in bales of 500 pounds) 



Type 


: Or 1 to bur 


I September-October 


1935 


t « 

'. 1936 


1935 


I Qf 56 


United States.; 


; Bales 


: Bales ' : 


Bales- i 


Bales 


89 , 000 j 
122,000 : 
2,000 : 
: 16,000 


: 58,000 J 
123,000 : 
\ 9,000- : 
: 49.000 : 


173,000 1 
: 230,000 

8,000 i 
: 32,000 : 


160,000 
: 477,000 
19,000 
179,000 




229,000 


\ 244,000 : 


443,000 


J 835,000 



Compiled from American Consulate reports, Kobe. 



JAPAN: Wharf stocks of raw cotton, October 1936, with comparisons 

(in bales of 500 pounds) 



: 1D35 


1936 


Type 5 October 

• • 

* • 


[ September 


October 


: Bales 


Bales 


: Bales 


* 


! 94,000 
i 260,000 s 
82,000 i 


: 13 9, too 

190,000 
103,000 


m 4 


; 436,000 ; 


437 , 000 



Compiled f rom Amer ican Consulate reports, Kobe. 



December 14, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 779 



COTTON: Price per pound of representative raw cotton at Liverpool, 
December 4, 19^6, with comparisons 











. 1036 










Growth 


October : 


November 


Dec. 




16 : 


23 : 


30 : 


6 : 


13 : 


20 : 


?7 






Cents: 


Cents : 


Cents : 


Cents: 


Cent° . 


Cents: 


Ceil 


ts: 


Cents 


American - : 
Middling 


14.25: 


lU.18: 


13. 87 


lU. 06 


1-^.64" 


13.77 


13. 


71 


13. .91 


Low Middling : 


13-03: 


12.95: 


12. 65. 


W.€k 


12. 26 


12. 70 


12. 


7 2 


12. Ug 


Egyptian (Fully good fair) . 
Sake llaridis 


22.22. 


22.57 


23. 26 


2^.08 


27. 8^ 


23. 00 


23. 


36 


22. 05 


Upners 


15.45: 


15. 16: 


lU.77 


15.05 


lU.qU 


15.20 


IS. 


06 


is. 25 


Brazilian (Fa.ir^ - 




















Ceara 


13.23" 


13. 16. 


12.99 


:13. l lL; 


12. 77 


1.2.90 


12. 


8^ 


12. 00 


Sao Paulo 


13. 7^ 


13.67. 


13. so 


13.65 


13.27 


13. 11 1 


13. 




13.S0 


Fast Indian - 




















Broach (Fully good) 


11. 50 


11.22 


11. 12 


11. 32 


IO.96 


11. 12 


11. 


08 


11.10 


C.P.Oomra No. 1, Superfine 


11.82 


11.55 


11. 45 


11.64 


11.28 


11.51 


11, 


U7 


:11.5g 


Sind (Fully good) 

Peruvian (Good) 


' 9- 35 


q .57 


9-57 


• 9.71 


9. U5 


• 0.6S 


: 9. 


63 




Tangui s 


:17.00 


17. 13 


17.07 


17- 21 


•16.83 


: 17. 07 


17. 


02 





Converted at ctirrent exchange rate. 



BUTTER: Price per pound in New York, San Francisco, Copenhagen, ?md 

London, December 10, 1936, with comparisons _ 

1936~ : 1Q7R 



Market and description 



New York, 9? score 

San Francisco, 92 score .... 

Copenhagen, official quotation 

London: : 

Danish : 

New Zealand : 

Dutch : 

Siberian : 



ember 3 


December 10 


December 12 


Cents : 


Cents 


Cents 


3^.2 
3^.0 
20. B 


34.0 

3^-5 
19.8 


33.0 
3U. 5 
?2.5 


25.9 
22.8 

21.6 

20. 7 


23. 4 

22. S . 

21.6 

20.8 


28.0 
10.2 
22.1 
1Q.2 



Foreign prices converted at current rates of exchange. 



78o 



!* o t" 3 Crox>«t anil ^arVets 



vol. 



; 7 , Po. 



FTTT'SH: He^ Zealand grarUnsr, 193^-37 pear on to ^ove r n"ber ?7, 

with com/oar i sens 



- - ■ Date 


1 07U -35 


1935- 7 6 ] 


l? 7 o 


-37 


Teok ended 


1 , '^oo pounds 


1 , "> X) r>"un^ s 


1 . ^ 


"ooun' 5 s 


August total 


12, 3^2 


l 11 717 


12, 


ppc 


September ^ 


4, 733 


4, 368 




0U0 


11 : 


5.432 


5 0H0 


5, 


5^4 


13 


o ?b 1 


5,37^ 




gF.O 


2o 


6,58^ 


: 5,762 


? ' 




Septenber total 


27,011 

u V -1.-1. 


20,552 


2 T , 


123 


October 2 


7, 700 


6,496 


7 , 




; 


3, 337 


: 7,637 


: g, 


12"! 


1 o 


3 , S^S 


: S,27? 


: g t 


960 


23 


9,' 156 


9^206 


: 9! 




70 




: 0 576 


: 0 


7hU 

I 


October total 


4M05 


41,143 


I17 


904 


November 6 


10,102 


10,24g 


: 10, 


760 


13 


: 10,416 


: 10,136 


: 11, 


200 


20 


: 1^,416 


: 10,1+72 


: 10, 


02^ 


27 


: lO.gOg 


: I\7^ 


: l n ! 


97^ 


November total 


: 41,83-2 


: ^1,216 


: U7, 


456 


Total August 1 to I'Overber 27 


; 121,700 


; 117,628 


; 1P2, 


713 


Agricultural Attache/ G. C. Taylor, London. 



P T JTTEH: Australian grading, 1936- 7 7 season to November 21, 



with comparisons 


Date ' 


iqTk-75 


1975- 7 6 


107^-77 


iTeek ended : 


1, 000 pounds : 


1 , TOO nounds . 


1 , Dounrl s 


July 1 to August 29 


14,561 : 


11,7^4 : 


7 ,9 q 7 


September 5 : 


2,912 : 


^79 : 


2,^12 


12 : 


3,835 : 


3 , °^o : 


2,639 


19 


U t Ug? ; 


1 


3,0.^0 


2b 


5! 073 : 


3.940 : 


3! 7-9 


September total ; 


lb,307 


12/435 


12,070' 


October 3 


5,784 


h t 771 


3,721 


10 


6,500 : 


0^83 


k ,059 


17 


0,516 : 


6,704 : 


k ,731 


24 


7,302 j 


7,155 : 


u ,525 


31 . ' 


g,b!7 


7, 723 : 




October total 


34, 719 


31, 7'41 


PP op'u. 


November 7 


S.590 : 


3,212 : 


u ,907 


1'4 


: 3,803 


8,631 


5,096 


PI 


: 7,52b 


8,38 k 


5 ',696 


Total July 1 to November 21 .. 


j 99,506 


. 81,147 


57,880 



leekly Dairy Produce Notes, Imperial Economic Committee 



December 14, 1936 Foreign Crops and Markets 781 



LARD AND LIVE HOGS: Exports from Danube Easin countries, 
January-October, 1934-1936 



Item and Period 


Hungary 


; Yugoslavia 


; Rumania 


• Bulgaria 


'; Total 


Lard 
1934 - 

First quarter 
Second quarter 
Third quarter 


1,000 

pounds 

1, 157 

5,005 

9,736 
1|137 


: 1,000 
: pounds 
127 

i 57 


1,000 
pounds 

0 
0 

8 


j 1,000 
' pounds 

0 

: 0 
! 8 


: 1,000 
: pounds 
: 1,284 
; 5,062 


10 months . 

First quarter . . 
Second quarter 
Third quarter 


20.035 


I 1,507 


0 


; 0 


21, 542 


17, 140 
12 , 148 
11,195 
.... 4,657 


j 2,683 
: 1,372 
: 2-185 
: 1,242 , 


1 

0 
0 

o 


22 

: 0 
: o 

: 0 


19,846 
13 , 520 
13,380 
5,899 


10 months .... 
1936 

First quarter 
Second quarter 
Third quarter 


45,140 


j 7,482 


l 


: 22 


52 , 645 


15, 101 
14,087 
6,029 
2.646 


; 5,011 
: 4,252 
: 3,002 
1,323 


162 
201 
455 
661 


1,880 
421 

0 
0 


22,154 
18,961 
9,486 
4,630 


10 months §j. . . . 
Live Hogs 
1934 

First quarter 
Second quarter 
Third quarter 

10 months , . 

1955 

First quarter 
Second quarter 
Third quarter 


37 865 


13 588 


1 ' 4,79 


? 301 


?3l 


28,320 
17,185 
38, 546 
15,355 


38 , 544 
25,825 
30,679 . 
14,786 


13 , 532 
14,512 
19,949 
9, 643 


124 

190 
0 
0 


80 , 520 
57,712 
89,174 
39, 794 


99,416 


109.834 


57.636 


314 


267,200 


41,767 
43,065 
44,200 
17,181 


37 , 554 
48, 148 
65,518 

26, 662 


17,667 
2 5 , 3 62 
43,089 
19,219 


61 
470 

o • 

o : 


97,049 
117,045 
152,807 

63,062 


10 months 

1936 

First quarter 
Second quarter ; 
Third quarter 
October a/ ... 

10 months a/ 


146,213 


177,882 ' 


105,337 ; 


531 ; 


429,963 


48, 608 
34,695 j 
46,636 : 
14,000 ; 


66,473 
66, 694 
81,760 
28,000 


43,015 j 
43,785 ! 
59,769 1 
23 , 000 ; 


185 j 
0 j 
1,000 
2,500 i 


158,281 
145,175 
189, 165 
67 , 500 


143,939 ' 


242,927 


169,570 j 


3, 685 ; 


560, 121 



a/ Preliminary 



782 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 33, No. 24 



GRAINS: Exports from the United States, July 1-Dec. 5, 1935 and 1936 
PORK: Exports from the United States, Jan. 1-Dec. 5, 1935 and 1936 



Commod ity 


; July 1 - Dec . 5 


; Week ended 


i 1935 


: 1936 


: Nov. .14 


: Nov. 21 


: Nov. 20 


; Dec. 5 


GRAINS: 

Barley a/ - 


[1,000 - 
! bushels 


: 1,000 ! 
bush els; 


1,000 
. bushels 


: 1,000 ; 
: bushels. 


1,000 
bushels' 


: 1,000 
' bushels 


72 : 
• 6,735 
5,508 
49: 
115 • 
0: 


1, 657; 
: 7,164: 
: 3,938: 
: 175; 
15: 

; 0: 


: 0 

42' 
0' 
0 

o 

0 


: 1: 
: 132, 

0 

: 0: 
5 1 
: 0: 


o- 

' 61, 
0- 
0 
0 
0 


0 

169 

: 0 
: 3 
: 0 
: 0 


PORK: ; 
Bacon, including sides .: 
Lard, excluding neutral.; 


, Jan. 1 • 

1,000 : 
pounds : 


- Dec. 5 : 

1,000 : 
pounds : 


: 

.1,000 i 
nounds • 


! 1,000 ' 
pounds : 


: 1,000 : 
pounds • 


1,000 
: pounds 


50,294 ; 
6,739 : 
7,603 • 

88,649 • 


38,643 ; 

4,-555 
10,210 : 
101,619 j 


794 : 

62 
601 : 
3,010 


912 
265 
61 : 
• 1,283 : 


• 781 : 
99 : 

59 : 
2,377 : 


581 
95 

0 

1,916 



Official records, Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. 

a/ Included this week: Pacific ports, wheat, none; flour, none; from San 

Francisco, barley, none; rice, none. 

hj Includes flour milled in bond from Canadian wheat, in terms of wheat. 



WHEAT, INCLUDETG FLOUR: Shipments from principal exporting countries 
as given by current trade sourc es, 193 3- 34 t o 1935-5 6 



To tal 

Country : shipments 


: Shipments 1936 
: week ended 


; Shipments 
:July 1 - Dec. 5 


: 1934-35:1935-36 


;Nov. 21 


SNov. 26 


: Dec. 5 


; 1935-36: 19 36-37 


: 1,000 : 1,000 
;bushels : bushels 


: 1,000 
tbushels 


: 1,000 
: bushels 


: 1,000 ■ 
: bush els ; 


: 1,000 : 1,000 
bushe Is: bush els 




: 5,043 
: 6,139 
; 123 


: 6,582 
61 


: 6,103: 
: 9,120: 
: 169: 


80,392:129,060 
•162,694:146,328 
• 6,735: 7,464 


Argent ina ; 186 , 228 : 77 , 384 ; 

Danube and Bulgaria d/. . . : 4,104: 8,2.16' 
British India ; c/2 , 313: c/2 , 529: 


1,064: 
980: 
: 0; 

1,150: 
352: 


964 
; 1 , 152 
0 

1,224 
856: 


: 1 , 331 : 
: 1,813: 
: 0: 
: 1,648: 
536: 


47,723: 25,023 
39,912: 29,537 
21,184: 38 
6,808; 36,688 
256: 5,584 










196,280:225,980 


Total European ship- : : j 


7,360: 




: 


f/ if/ " 
139,36 0:161,112 


Total ex-European ship- : : ; 


1,632: 




if] if/ 
: 50,680: 56,144 



Compiled from official and trade sources, a/ Broomhall's Corn Trade News, 
b/ Fort William, Port Arthur, Vancouver, Prince Rupert;, an d New Westminster, 
c/ Official, d/ Black Sea shipments only, e/ Total of trade figures includes 
North America as reported by Broomhall. fj. To November 21. 



December 14, 1936 



Foreign Croos and Markets 



EXCHANGE RATES: Average weekly and"" monthly values in Tew York of 
specified currencies, December 5, 1936, with comparisons a/ 



Country' 



Argentina. 
Canada. . . . 

China 

Denmark. . . 
England. . . 
France. . . . 
Germany. . . 

Italy 

Jaoan 

Mexico. .'. . 
Netnerlands 
Norway. . . 
Sweden. . . 
Switzerland 



i tl w i J. c> \j rTUi. v 

Unit ' ~" r 


Month 


week ended 


f< 1934 


1935 


1936 


1936 














' Nov . 


Nov. 


Dec. 




Nov . 


Nov . 


Sept. 


Oct. 


: Nov . 


-21 


28 


5 




Cent s 


: Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


• Cents 


Cent s 


• -Cents 


Paper peso- 


33. 26 


32.82 


33.61 


• 32.67 


32.58 


32.59 


32.64 


• 32.69 


Dollar .' 


102. 47 


98.92 


100.02 


•100.02 


100.12 


100.13 


100.17 


100.05 


Shang . yuan 


33.39 


29.65 


29.94 


29.33 


29 . 47 


29 . .47 


29.55 


: 29.60 




22.27 


21.98 


22.48 


21.87 


21.82 


21.83 


21.85 


21.89 


Pound 


49b . 90 


492. 50 


503.63 


489.84- 


488.8.0 


486.95 


489.62 


49© . 38 


Franc 


6.59: 


6.59 


6.51 


4.67 


4.65 


4.65 


4.66 


4.66 


R e i ch sraark : 


40.21 


40.23 


40.08 


40.20 


40.22 


40.23 


40.23 


40.23 


Lira : 


8.54 


8.10 


7.85 


5.53 


5.26 


' 5.26 


5.26 


5.26 


Yen. 


29.06 


28.68 


29.41 


28.61 


28.56 


28.58 


28 . 60 


28.56 


Peso • 


27.76 


27.77 


27.. 75 


27.75 


27 . 75 


27.75 


27.75 


27.75 


Guilder . . . 


67.60 


67.80 


66. 74 


53.63 


53.99 


54.05 


54.22 


54. 39 


Krone 


25.07- 


' 24.74 


25. 30 


24.61 


24.56 


24.56 


24.60 


24.64 


Krona * 


25.72 


25.39 


25.96 


25, 25 


25.20 


25.20 


25 . 24 


25.28 


Franc 


32.47 


32.44 


31.42 


22.99 


22.98 


22.99 


22.98 


22.99 



Federal Reserve Board. a/ Noon "buying rates ^or cable transfers, 



LIVESTOCK AND MEAT: Price per 100 pounds in specified European markets* 
December 2, 1936, with comparisons a/ 





Week ended 


Market and item 


December 4, 


' November 25, 


December 2, 




1935 


1936 


1936 




Dollars 


Dollars 


Dollars 


Germany: 










17.70 


17.70 


: 17.70 




15.37, 


13.61 


13.88 


United Kingdom: b/ 








Prices at Li^eroool first quality- 








American green bellies 


Nominal 


18.14 


18.17 


Danish Wiltshire sid^s 


18 . 05 


19.67 


19.70 




15.30 


17.59 


17.52 


American short cut green hams... 


20 . 31 


20.54 


20.56 




15.76 


14.01 


14.69 



Liveroool Quotations are on the basis of sale from importer to wholesaler, 
a/ Converted at current rate of exchange, b/ 1Tr eek ended Friday. 



< 



784 



Foreign Crops and Markets 
Index 



Vol. 33, No. 24 



Page 

Late cables 754 

Crop and Market Prospects 755 



Agricultural exports, U.S.: 

Index numbers, October 1936 765 

Principal commodities, 

October 1936 ; ..767-770 

Agri cultural imports, principal 

commodities, U.S., October 1936 771 
Butter: 
Grad ings; 

Australia, Nov. 21, 1936 780 

New Zealand, Nov. 27, 1936 .... 780 
Prices, specified markets, 

Dec. 10, 1936 779 

Corn, production, Italy, 

1935", 1936 '. . 754 

Cotton: 

Imports, Japan, 

October 1936 759,778 

Prices, U.K., Dec. 4, 1936 779 

Production: 

Bra&il (Northern), 1936 759 

Egypt, 1935,1936 754 

Stocks, Japan, October 1936 778 

Exchange rates, foreign, 

Dec. 5, 1936 783 

Foodstuffs, movement facilitated, 

China, 193 6 765 

Grains : 

Exports, U.S., Dec. 5, 1936 782 

Movement (feed), principal 

countries, Dec. 5, 1936 ....... 777 

Prices (feed), principal markets, 

Dec. 5, 1936 777 

Lard: 

Exports, Danube Basin, 

1934-1936 762,781 

Situation, Danube Basin, 

October 1936 762 



Page 

Livestock: 

Exports (hcgs), Danube Basin, 

1934-1936 763,781 

Export situation, Danube Basin, 

October-December 1936 ......... 762 

Meat: 

Exports (pork), U.S. , Dec .5 ,1936 . . 782 
Import duty (beef), U.K.,. 

Nov. 20, 1936 . 764 

Import quotas, (cured pork), U.K., 

Jan. 1-Feb. 11, 1937 754 

Prices (pork), foreign markets, 

Dec. 2, 1936 783 

Melons (honeydew) , export quota for 

New York, Chile, 1936-37 760 

Potatoes, production, Italy, 

1935,1936 754 

Rice: 

Production: 

Italy, 1935,1936 754 

Taiwan, 1932-1936 758 

Rye: 

Acreage reduction (winter), 

Poland, 1937 754 

Prices, U.S., Dec. 5, 1936 777 

Tomatoes, exnort prospects, 

Cuba, 1936-37 ." 761 

Wheat: 

Acreage reduction (winter), 

Poland, 1937 754 

Market situation, Europe, 

November 1936 756 

Prices, specified markets, 

Dec. 5," 1936 776 

Production, Italy ,' 1935, 1936 .... 754 
Shipments, principal countries, 

Dec. 5, 1936 . . .' 782 

Situation, Europe, November 1936. 755 
Sowing conditions, Europe, 

November 1936 755,757